CEN article: Tesco in second bid to sell booze

Home - Tesco. TESCO has appealed against a decision not to give it an alcohol licence for its Cambridge Mill Road store – after vowing not to sell booze in “known disorder” areas.
The appeal comes despite the troubled area being designated a “cumulative impact zone”, which creates a presumption against giving out new alcohol licenses.

Cambridgeshire police objected to the original application on the grounds it could add to disorder in the area.

But Tesco chiefs have appealed against the decision despite the statement on their website which says: “We do not apply for licences in areas with known disorder issues.”

Cambridge City Council’s licensing sub-committee’s decision on August 17 to reject the store’s booze application was greeted by loud applause from campaigners.

Ruth Deyermond, planning co-ordinator of the No Mill Road Tesco campaign, hailed the decision “a victory for common sense and the community”.

Tesco sought a licence to sell alcohol from 10am-10pm seven days a week.

But police opposed the application arguing further alcohol sales would exacerbate alcohol-related problems.

Insp Marcia Nichols said the area suffered a “disproportionate” level of alcohol-related trouble and was already a “hotspot for violence”.

But Tesco will attempt to persuade councillors to grant a licence in December.

A Tesco spokeswoman said: “We have submitted an appeal against the decision for the alcohol licence. Our Express store in Mill Road is extremely popular and customers have told us they would like the opportunity to purchase our full range of items and this includes beers, wines and spirits.

“As a company, we take our responsibilities regarding the sale of alcohol exceptionally seriously and we already have robust policies in place to ensure our staff sell alcohol legally.”

No Mill Road Tesco Campaign has vowed to fight the licence bid.

A spokeswoman said: “We will maintain the opposition we successfully put forward at the licensing committee last time.”
The case will now be heard at Cambridge Magistrates’ Court.

A council statement said: “We have been advised Tesco Stores Ltd have appealed the sub-committee’s decision and consequently the matter will be subject to a further hearing in the Magistrates’ Court.”

Cambridge News, 3rd October 2009

Tesco appeal failure to obtain alcohol license in Cumulative Impact Zone (update)

We have just received formal notification from the City Council that:

“Following the decision of the Licensing Sub-Committee on the 17th August 2009, we have been advised that Tesco Stores Ltd. have appealed the Sub-Committee’s decision and consequently the matter will be subject to a further hearing in the Magistrates Court. It is likely that persons who attended to speak on the 17th August may be asked to attend the Magistrates Court on a date to be set by them. We will keep you advised of developments.”

More news as we get it.

Tesco appeal failure to obtain alcohol license in Cumulative Impact Zone

Last month, Tesco failed in their bid to obtain an alcohol license for their Mill Road store, which is in a Cumulative Impact Zone, which creates a rebuttable presumption against new alcohol licenses. This is despite the statement on their website that

“We do not apply for licences in areas with known disorder issues”

We have now heard that, as expected, Tesco plans to appeal.

We are finding out exactly what process will be followed, and will report any updates here. We will maintain the opposition we successfully put forward at the Licensing Committee last month.

An update on this and other matters will be published shortly.

Photos from Mill Road independent trading event

On Saturday 12th September, a celebration of local shops and independent traders took place outside Hilary’s greengrocers on Mill Road. A very enjoyable and cordial day was had.

Two new flyers, ‘The fight goes on’ and ‘Why celebrate Mill Road?’ were handed out.

Mill Road Tesco issue featured in Private Eye!

Fame at last … We’ve made it into Private Eye – see Page 30 of the latest edition!

(Please let us know if you have a copy that we can scan and put here.)

Mill Road celebrates its independent shops and traders

On Saturday 12th September 12 noon to 2 pm, a celebration of local shops and independent traders will take place outside Hilary’s greengrocers on Mill Road. There will be a variety of activities, games, music, food samples provided by local shops and restaurants, and a BBQ as well as special offers. This event is open to all.

This event is organised by the No Mill Road Tesco Campaign as part of our support of local traders.

If you would like to help please turn up at 10.30.  All help will be greatly appreciated.

millroadcelebration

AGM call

As notified to the supporters’ e-mail list:

The AGM of the Mill Road Society (under which No Mill Road Tesco runs) will be held on Tuesday 1st September at 7.30pm St Phillips Church.

We will be updating everyone on recent activities, electing new committee members and making decisions about the future of the campaign.

Please do come along if you are able. It is important that we continue to receive input from as many supporters as possible.

Agenda:

  1. Report back on current legal situation
  2. Discussion of Saturday 12th September event
  3. Future direction of the campaign and ongoing activities
  4. Presentation of Accounts
  5. Election of Committee
  6. Any Other Business

Lorry Watch: Tesco using unmarked vans

We are continuing to monitor the lorry situation.

Interestingly, we have evidence that Tesco are using unmarked vans, i.e. without the Tesco logo on, to deliver round the ‘loop’.

So watch out for white lorries without any markings but also for contractor vehicles, namely “Expert Logistics” and “Petit Forestier” (both seen parked at back of Tesco site on Saturday).

Dear supporters

P1120894Dear Supporters,

Despite two council decisions, one public inquiry and the best efforts of several thousand local residents over two years, Tesco are opening on Mill Road tomorrow, 26th August 2009.

We expect that a judicial review of the situation will happen later – hopefully very soon – but in the meantime, a judge has decided not to stop Tesco opening for now. With that in mind, we would like to say what we think this does, and doesn’t, mean, and what we want to do next.

The fact that very few local residents seem to want them while thousands want them to stay away; that they already own 13 stores in our small city, and are already trying to open yet another, on East Road; that their delivery operations have been judged to be dangerous by all competent authorities that have looked at them (and by Tesco themselves); that they would be more expensive and offer less choice than the existing shops; that they have been refused applications for the site again and again – none of this has been enough to stop them opening.

We think that any system where this can happen is a system that is deeply flawed and needs fixing. We think that local residents should have a meaningful voice in what happens to their community, so that when a dangerous and unpopular scheme like this appears, the community can take action to stop it.

But we also think that however unhappy we may be about Tesco opening, that the community has won far more than Tesco from this fight, and we won from the moment that the first person signed the petition, or put a poster up in their window, or went to a campaign meeting.

Whatever happens in the future, Tesco will never get back the more than £4.6 million in lost turnover that we estimate the delay in opening has cost them. They will always have been humiliated at two council meetings, a public inquiry and an alcohol license hearing. The delay meant, too, that they have had to open after Mill Road became a cumulative impact zone, meaning that they did not get an alcohol license. The efforts of the local community to highlight the dangers of deliveries and the noise and nuisance of their plans also meant that they had to open a much smaller store than they wanted, and one that is more expensive to operate. All this means that the local community has managed to permanently restrict the damage that this store can do to the area.

In contrast, the community has gained more than any of us could ever have imagined when the campaign started, almost two years ago. Many of us know our neighbours better, use our local shops more, and have learned to do things that we never thought we could do. The campaign has shown that thousands of people of every political viewpoint, age, religious view, and background can put aside the things that divide them and stand up together for something that unites them.

The mural on the Mill Road bridge says “respect and diversity in our community”. We think this campaign has proved that this is exactly what the Mill Road community is like. We always knew that Mill Road was a special place; that’s why we’ve all fought so hard to protect it. The two years of that fight have shown us how right we were.

So, even if Tesco are eventually allowed to stay open on Mill Road, we think that the community is much stronger and Tesco is weaker as a result of what has happened here.

So what happens next? Well, that depends on the outcome of the legal process, but in any case there are two things we would like to ask you to do if you have supported the campaign. These reflect the two concerns that have come up again and again over the last two years – the threat to road safety and the threat to local shops.

We are asking everyone to keep an eye on Tesco’s deliveries. They are not allowed to stop lorries (their own or their suppliers’) on the street – either on Mill Road or Sedgwick Street. They have to respect the one way system. If they don’t, or if they stop on the street, let us know and let planning enforcement and the police know.

traders

Traders of Mill Road: Support variety and choice on Mill Road

Secondly, and just as importantly, the best way that you can show your continued opposition to Tesco is to support your local independent shops. It’s likely that most of us will never want buy anything from this store, but more important than a boycott of a dull, overpriced chain store is a commitment to actively support the diverse and independent shops that Tesco threatens. Tesco will only hurt these businesses if we let it; so we’re asking all supporters to buy something from an independent business on Mill Road tomorrow. And to do the same the next day. And the day after that. Using our local shops is the way to keep them alive.

We will let you know as soon as we have any news about the legal action, but until then these are things that we can do, starting tomorrow, to help our community.

With all our best wishes and gratitude for your support,

The No Mill Road Tesco Campaign Committee

PS There will not be a protest at the opening of the store.

Legal action – money raised

Dear Supporters,

We emailed you on Saturday to ask if you could help us with the costs of legal action. Thanks to your amazing generosity, we have now raised enough money to cover these costs. The fact that the target has been reached so quickly is the clearest possible signal of how strongly we all feel about the situation and the need for legal action to resolve it.

With huge thanks,
The No Mill Road Tesco Campaign